Lucky Leprechaun Quilt Block

St. Patrick’s Day is always special to me.  You see, it’s my Dad’s birthday!  So it has always meant more than wearing green and trying not to get pinched!  It has always been a day to celebrate my Dad, Larry!  That’s why I wanted to name this quilt block after him.  Now, I’m not sure if he would be happy about this or not, but be sure that I will always be thinking of him on his special day – and what better way than with a quilt block named after him!  Meet Larry the Lucky Leprechaun Quilt Block!

Materials List to Make the Lucky Leprechaun Quilt Block

Cutting up the fabric

It’s no secret that I love Painter’s Palette solids from PBS Fabrics! I carry quite a few colors in my own shop because it’s so nice to have your favorite colors to hand. You can check out my selection in my ONLINE SHOP. I have started using the TrueCut Cutting system for preparing my fabric and I have really started loving the track guide system. If you want to learn more about this cutting system, check out the TrueCut website. Be sure to use my coupon code NICOLE10 for 10% off your order!

Sewing the Quilt Block Together

I think that piecing the quilt block is my favorite part. Of course I am using my Juki TL2010Q for piecing. What I love about this quilt block is that are NO NESTING SEAMS! What a fun sew when you don’t need to worry about that! You still need to try your best for a quarter inch seam allowance! I have a great article about that right HERE. I always use my quarter inch presser foot and my Sew Steady Grid Glider. These two products, used together, have really helped me perfect my seam allowance! I also love good lighting and my Daylight Company Slimline 3 is perfectly perched above my sewing machine station!

The final touches!

Finally, no quilt block is perfect until it is pressed! I loved using my Oliso Mini Iron! These cute irons come in a variety of colors. I thought that the yellow iron was a perfect match for the project I was working on. Side note: These little irons get super hot and even have a steam function! I take one with me on retreats and use them next to my machine. Perfect!

Larry the Lucky Leprechaun

I just love how this Leprechaun Quilt Block comes together! I will be making more and incorporating several into either a table runner or maybe a table topper! What would you make with this fun and simple quilt block? Let us know in the comments!

Be sure to share your creations in my Modern Quilts Facebook Group! We’d love to see what you’ve been making!

Happy Quilting!

Nicole Moore Blog Post Signature

Lucky Clover Mug Rug

Making a Lucky Clover Mug Rug is fun and easy!  These mug rugs are the perfect project for St. Patrick’s Day.  In this tutorial, I show you a couple different designs you can make.  The first is with the Cricut Machine and the second is by utilizing a solid fabrics to make a rainbow design.  I will also share how to quilt and attach your binding.  Be sure to check out the bottom of this article where I link my video tutorial.  Let’s get started making a Lucky Clover Mug Rug!

Making a Lucky Clover Mug Rug is fun and easy!  These mug rugs are the perfect project for St. Patrick's Day.

Supply List

 

Material List

Using the Cricut Machine

For our first Lucky Clover Mug Rug, we will use the Cricut Machine to add this fun text design to our Lucky Clover Mug Rug. 

Making a Lucky Clover Mug Rug is fun and easy!  These mug rugs are the perfect project for St. Patrick's Day.  I used my Cricut Maker to embellish one side of this mug rug!
#mugrugs #mugrug #coasters #handmade #sewing #quiltingismytherapy #SnackMat

I found this text design on the Cricut Design Space. This was a free pattern and I think it’s just perfect for this mug rug. Re-size the size of the design so it will fit nicely on the square piece of fabric.  Adjust the pressure to ‘more’, even though you are only using the iron on vinyl. We don’t want to forget to mirror my image so that it will appear the correct way at the end of the process. Load up your mat and let the cutting begin. 

Using my Cricut weeding tool, I removed the excess vinyl from the carrier sheet. This design has quite a few areas that need weeding so I like to use my Daylight Company Lightbox to help me see the microscopic cut lines.  I love my lightbox for a variety of things in my sewing room and weeding is just one of them.

Take your vinyl text design and center it on your project. I like to use a small Teflon sheet to cover the project before I apply the heat from my iron.  Carefully peel the carrier sheet away from the lettering.

Making a rainbow panel design

This rainbow design is super simple to achieve. Just grab some rainbow fabrics, like the ones I have in my online fabric shop. 

Making a Lucky Clover Mug Rug is fun and easy!  These mug rugs are the perfect project for St. Patrick's Day.  This is fun rainbow panel I made as an embellishment.
#mugrugs #mugrug #coasters #handmade #sewing #quiltingismytherapy #SnackMat

I’ve cut these into 1 inch strips and sew them together in rainbow order. Altogether, I made three sets of these strips and sewed them together to make a rainbow panel. After I sewed them all together, I used my Oliso Mini Iron to press the seams open. I can get my seams really flat when I use a hot iron, a Wool Pressing Mat, and I also like to use the Best Press Spray Starch as well. 

 

Laying out the rainbows at a diagonal (instead of a horizontal or vertical layout) was a fun design choice. In order to get an easy diagonal layout, get a ruler that has a 45° mark and lay that against the bottom edge of your rainbow panel.

Make the first cut at a 45° angle and then measure your next cut 5 1/2 inches perpendicular to that. You’ll be basically making a 5 1/2 inch, square to match the size of your unfinished Lucky Clover Quilt Block.  Now sew your cut rainbow panel design to your quilt block. 

Quilting your Mug Rug

Now it’s time to quilt your mug rugs. Lay your backing fabric wrong side up and cover this with some batting. I’m using some leftover batting from a quilt I had recently finished.  Since I’ve made several mug rugs I’m going to be laying these all out at the same time. This helps me to eliminate waste. Next I’m going to spray some fabric adhesive to help keep my mug rug in place while I prepare to quilt them. 

Once I have these in place, I’ll take my acrylic ruler and rotary cutter and separate these into single units. When I’m cutting these out, I’m careful to leave an a small excess of fabric around the perimeter of each mug rug. I’d say about an inch or so will do just fine. 

Straight-line Quilting on the Grid

Now you can quilt this mug rugs anyway that you’d like, but I think an easy solution is to draw a 1 inch grid with a chalk marker.  These refillable chalk pens are super handy and come in a variety of chalk colors. 

Quilting along the chalk marks is super easy. I use a 3 inch stitch length and a 50 weight cotton thread. Since the lines are already marked, you can quilt these up in no time.   Take your acrylic ruler and rotary cutter to trim off the excess batting and backing. 

Attaching the Binding

For the binding, I simply cut a width of the fabric by 2 1/4 and then folded and pressed in half.  Leaving about a 6 inch tail at the beginning, I stitched the binding to the perimeter of the mug rug being sure to miter each corner as demonstrated. I like using my quarter inch presser foot for attaching the binding.  I also like using a stiletto to help manage the thread when it comes to the corners.

When we come to about 6 inches from where we started, simply stop sewing and connect the two ends of your binding strip. 

Bring your longest binding strip and nest it next to the beginning seam of the shortest strip.  Using a frixion pen, make a mark at this nesting point and cut the longest strip at the mark.  Now, measure the opposite strip to your original binding width.  Remember, mine was 2 1/4 inches.  Mark this and trim the strip.   Start removing stitches from your shortest binding strip until both strips are unsewn evenly.  Fold your project, right sides together and place a clip about an inch back from the starting seams.  Open and align your seams as demonstrated in my video below.

I like to make a mark to help determine where my sewing line needs to be.  I’m using a 1″ x 6″ acrylic ruler and a frixion pen for this.  Use sewing pins to hold your strips in  place and stitch the two strips together.  Take out your clip and ensure the strip is the right length before your trim off the excess fabric.  I am using a seam roller to open this seam.  You can also use an iron.  Now, stitch the remaining binding to your project.  Using your fabric scissors, trim the excess from the corners. Be careful not to cut the binding strips.

Finishing your Mug Rugs

The last thing to do is to finish the binding. You can either do hand binding or machine binding. It’s really up to your personal preference. I have video tutorials on both techniques and have hyperlinked them in the previous sentences.

Watch the Video

Be sure to share your Lucky Clover Mug Rugs in my Facebook Group!

Happy Sewing!

Nicole Moore Blog Post Signature
Lucky Clover Quilt Block - PDF Pattern Download in three sizes with a free video tutorial

Lucky Clover Quilt Block

The Lucky Clover quilt block is the perfect block for St. Patrick’s Day or any day you are feeling a little lucky. You’ll find that this simple four patch block is easy to cut and assemble. The lucky clover quilt block is made mostly of snowballed sections with a fun little stem. The pattern includes measurements for 3 different sizes so your making options are limitless!  Let me show you how it’s done!

Materials List

Supply List

Let’s Start Assembly

Once you’ve cut your fabrics to size we’re going to first create these snowballed corners. Take your smallest blue pieces and arrange them on top of your green blocks. I like to prepare my blocks for sewing by using Elmers washable school glue. I’m using a micro tipped bottle to add minimal amounts of glue to each piece. Once you have your glue in place you’ll just arrange the blue squares over the glue dots.  Take a hot iron to all these glued pieces.  This will speed up the glue drying process.  You’ll do the same thing for the stem block. I’m using just a little bit more glue because that piece is bigger. If you don’t want to use glue, that’s OK you can always  try to keep things stable while sewing or use sewing pins as well.

Sewing your Quilt Block

Taking all of these pieces to the sewing machine, we will stitch these corner squares into place on the diagonal. I’ve laid down a piece of blue painters tape with a line down the middle. This helps me to avoid marking each piece. Instead, I’m just keeping the small fabric piece aligned from the top diagonal to the bottom while I’m stitching in place. I’m doing this with some chain piecing, which makes the process go that much faster. 

For the larger stem block, I’ve marked my diagonal line with a ruler and a chalk marker. Once I have all of my stitching done, I cut off the excess fabric by using my fabric scissors. For the larger stem Block, I use a small ruler and rotary cutter.

It’s a Pressing Matter

Now it’s time to press our seams open. I love using my wool pressing mat and my Oliso mini iron. 

After pressing all of the seams open, you’ll add the other blue piece to the opposite side of your stem block. Draw another chalk line and stitch this into place. Cut off the excess and press those seams open as well.

Combining all the blocks

Now it’s time to assemble our blocks. I changed from a regular presser foot to a quarter inch seam foot. This helps me achieve a perfect 1/4 inch seam allowance. Once you’ve sewn on the top unit and the bottom unit, press your seams in the opposite direction. Next your seams and sew those units together. Press that final seam open and you have yourself a lucky clover quilt block!

Make a few Lucky Clover Quilt Blocks for a small project or make more for a table runner or lap quilt. Remember, this pattern comes in three different sizes. head over to the link in my description to get your pattern and start making these fun Lucky Clover blocks today!